FDA Has Approved MDMA Trials for PTSD Treatment

The American Psychiatric Association published an article last week that said researchers have already done 16 years of trials on MDMA and have come to believe that it could be a breakthrough therapy for people suffering from severe PTSD.
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FDA Has Approved MDMA Trials for PTSD Treatment

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved several phase-3 trials of 3, 4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), otherwise known as ecstasy, for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder. Researchers believe the drug could be the best new treatment for the disorder.

The American Psychiatric Association published an article last week that said researchers have already done 16 years of trials on the drug and have come to believe that it could be a breakthrough therapy for people suffering from severe PTSD.

The founder of the Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies (MAPS) Rick Doblin said that “For the first time ever, psychedelic-assisted psychotherapy will be evaluated in Phase 3 trials for possible prescription use, with MDMA-assisted psychotherapy for PTSD leading the way. Now that we have agreement with FDA, we are ready to start negotiations with the European Medicines Agency.”

At least 868,000 of our military veterans are on disability for PTSD, costing the Department of Veterans Affairs $17 billion annually. If the treatment truly is a breakthrough drug, many of those veterans may be able to return to work if the drug is legalized and regulated.

MDMA became famous by its nickname ecstasy as a club drug at rave parties. It is best known for its euphoric feel-good touchy qualities. While the drug can make you feel fantastic, it can also be dangerous. The amphetamine in MDMA drug can elevate the heartrate and blood pressure or cause overheating and dehydration. It can also have negative psychological effects and induce extreme emotions. Enough deaths occurred from the club drug that the DEA classified in the same class with heroin in 1985.

The trials will consist of patients with severe PTSD in Canada, Israel and the U.S. starting in the spring of next year.

Niko Mann is a freelance writer living in Los Angeles.

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